In The News




HedgeCo CEO Evan Rapoport discuss HedgeCo.Net and Hedge Funds moving to Florida with Fox Business News
Feb 14, 2013


Evan Rapoport on Fox Business - The Willis Report with Gerri Willis
Tax Savings Driving People to Florida?

Jan 30, 2013


Evan Rapoport on CNBC Power & Money
Hedge Funds: Are They Over?

July, 2008


Evan Rapoport on CNBC Power Lunch
August, 2006



Annual Investment Industry Summit Convenes on Eve of JOBS Act Title II

McGladrey.com - November 05, 2013

Only days before the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) lifted its Depression-era ban on the general solicitation of private placements, a number of investment industry speakers participating in McGladrey's 5th Annual Investment Industry Summit held in New York City shared some vivid insights into just what the historic change could mean for capital-seeking entrepreneurs.

The lifting of the ban was just one of a number of hot-button topics that summit attendees explored as part of an annual industry update session where different speakers delved into a breadth of regulatory subject areas such as first time SEC examinations, custody rule violations, and new rules for verifying the accreditation status of investors under the JOBS Act.

The full article is available here: McGladrey.com



SEC Makes Investors Jump Through Hoops as Fund Managers Wait for New Rules

OnWallStreet.com - March 17, 2013

Last year, Congress passed the JOBS Act, a new bill that was designed to foster the growth of startups. Hedge funds were particularly excited about the bill because it was expected to allow the Securities and Exchange Commission to form new rules for the industry.

However, in the months since the bill was passed, little has come from the JOBS Act. Hedge funds are still waiting to hear from the SEC, and investors are still jumping through hoops.

"That's something that's very frustrating for us as a firm because we are someone that provides data to only the accredited audience currently," Evan Rapoport, CEO of HedgeCo Networks, told StreetID. "In order to come on to HedgeCo, and to view hedge fund information, you first have to go through an online questionnaire that asks some pretty personal questions, such as your net worth, your liquid net worth, how many funds have you invested in, etc."

The full article is available here: OnWallStreet.com



Will Hedge Funds Advertise During the Super Bowl?

ValueWalk - March 8, 2013

Every year, millions of Americans tune in to the nation's biggest sporting event: the Super Bowl. Virtually every industry has used the Big Game to promote its products and services.

Every industry except for hedge funds, that is. For better or worse, viewers shouldn't expect that to change next year — even if the JOBS Act makes it possible.

"I don't think you're going to see that at all," Evan Rapoport, CEO of HedgeCo Networks, told StreetID. "In fact, I think what you're going to find is very targeted types of advertisements. They're going to really want to appeal to only those that are qualified and allowed to invest."

One of the drawbacks of advertising on TV (during a sporting event or regular programming) is that 99 percent of the people watching will not even be allowed to legally invest in the fund.

"Putting up a billboard is pretty ineffective in that manner in that you're just not targeting the right audience," said Rapoport.

The full article is available here: ValueWalk



HedgeCo Maps Seed Investments

Hedge Fund Alert - March 6, 2013

Hedge Fund Alert - March 6, 2013



Hedge Funds Making a Bee Line for Palm Beach County

World Property Channel - Jan 2013

Evan Rapoport, CEO of HedgeCo.net, a data base and website for hedge funds, has been based in West Palm Beach for ten years, having moved to the area from New York. "The tax issue was out there as long as we can remember, but it was only recently, when the federal tax rate increased for those making over $400,000," as a result of the resolution of the "fiscal cliff," that many hedge funds started thinking about coming to Florida, he says. "Most people in (the hedge fund) industry make more than $400,000, so (the new rate) is hitting home right now," says Rapoport.

But according to Smallridge, between 27 and 30 hedge funds had moved to Palm Beach County already in the last two or three years. As for the tax advantages, the main draw is not just the recent increase in federal taxes, but higher taxes at the state and local levels in the Northeast, she says. "If you make $1 million in New York, you pay close to $70,000 in state personal income taxes," says Smallridge, quoting data from the accounting firm Alpern Rosenthal. Sales tax is also higher in New York than in Palm Beach County, 9% versus 6%, she says.

Given the advances in technology, Rapoport says that he can operate his business from anywhere. "Additionally, Palm Beach County is one of the wealthiest counties in the country and I had a lot of investor contacts here, so for those who want to raise funds, (South Florida, and Palm Beach County in particular, is fertile ground)," he says. Also, Rapoport, who monitors 8,100 hedge funds around the world, says that he likes being a bigger fish in a smaller pond.

The full article is available here: World Property Channel



'Wall St.' flees NY for tax-free Fla.

New York Post - Jan 2013

New York (HedgeCo.Net) – Tired of New York's high city and state tax rates, the New York Post reports that some hedge funds are moving to Florida's Palm Beach County.

"You weigh all of the benefits for being here to those in New York, and they outweigh them every time," said Evan Rapoport, CEO of HedgeCo.net, which is expanding its presence in Palm Beach County. "This fiscal-cliff issue, with tax rates continuing to go up. We're seeing where we're going with taxes."

"Federal tax rates are the same in Florida and New York. But there's no state income tax in the Sunshine State. Compare that to New York, where the state and local governments took $14.71 of every $100 earned in 2010, according to state records. The only state with a higher rate is Alaska." The New York Post reports.

With so many people in the hedge fund industry using technology to communicate, the Post noted, picking up and moving shop is no longer a big deal.

The full article is available here: New York Post



Service Firms See Gold in JOBS Act

Hedge Fund Alert - May 2012

HedgeCo is among a handful of hedge fund-services firms that are positioning themselves to capitalize on the JOBS Act. The West Palm Beach, Fla., firm is setting up an advertising-placement unit that would connect fund managers with financial-news publications and websites. The Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act, which President Obama signed into law on April 5, includes a provision that lifts an age-old ban on private-fund operators marketing to the general public.

HedgeCo chief executive Evan Rapoport said that once the SEC formally implements the change, he expects to see hedge fund promotions popping up in a variety of formats and venues. His company already has drawn up proposals for five hedge fund clients that want to start advertising.

Rapoport said the freedom to advertise could give smaller fund operators a much-needed boost — though they still are limited to raising capital from accredited and qualified investors. Meanwhile, a group of industry players has set up a website called HedgeFundReputation.com that is designed to optimize Internet searches for the names of hedge fund operators. Other service providers said they're waiting to see how the SEC implements the JOBS Act provision before deciding whether to pursue new marketing ventures.

The full article is available here: New York Post



New Dawn For Hedge Funds If Ad Ban Lifted

Markets Media - Apr 2012

President Barack Obama's 'Jobs Act' is expected to be signed into law next month. The securities-law rollback would lift long-embedded marketing restrictions on private markets, giving hedge funds and private equity managers the ability to advertise to public investors in the mass markets.

Two decades ago, the hedge fund industry was known for its 'Wild Wild West' culture as they were largely unregulated and available to just the world's wealthiest investors. In recent years, hedge funds have diversified their clientele by opening up to more mainstream investors, along with an industry push to increase transparency, due diligence and operational excellence.

"This continues a trend toward convergence of financial services products," said Patrick Morris, senior managing partner at Hagin Investment Management. "The mutual fund and hedge fund worlds are colliding and they are marketing increasingly to the same clients."

As transparency increases, the push to widen the hedge fund appeal is "positive" for the investment community at large, according to Evan Rapoport, chief executive of consultancy HedgeCo Networks.

Investment vehicles such as UCITS (Undertakings for Collective Investment in Transferable Securities) funds, which harbor daily liquidity requirements, are moving the alternative investment community toward having "transparency mandates that require funds to report holdings", according to Rapoport. Still, for some, such vehicles may mirror mutual funds, which will never have the same appeal as hedge funds.

The full article is available here: Markets Media



Ex-UBS Prime Broker Named HedgeCo President

FINalternatives - Apr 2012

HedgeCo Networks has hired a Wall Street veteran to serve as its president.

Brett Langbert joins from UBS, where he led prime brokerage sales for the Americas. He said that his new firm's "unique approach to helping start-ups and emerging manager funds represent a significant business opportunity and I am excited by the opportunity to leverage my experience in this entrepreneurial environment."

The full article is available here: FINalternatives



Ron Reuven, On Starting a Hedge Fund

The Wall Street Journal - March 8, 2012

Ron Reuven is CEO and president of Reuven Enterprises in New York.

Three years ago I started a hedge fund after years of work as a financial adviser.

I learned from my experience that there are two ways for advisers to start a fund. There's the cheap way and then there's the right way. You can theoretically start a company with a couple hundred dollars, buy some documents on the internet for a few grand, and then call yourself a fund.

If you want to raise some real money and have a real future, though, you have to start by putting some legitimate names on your fund document. That involves hiring a law firm that's reputable within the hedge fund industry. When an institutional investor or someone with experience in hedge funds reads your documents, they need to know that any logistical issues associated with the fund have been resolved. A well-established law firm can give investors assurance in the fund, regardless of the name of the fund manager. The same goes for reputable administrators and auditors. There are a number of hedge fund database websites like hedgeco.net, hedgefund.net, globalhfa.com that provide lists of these kinds of service providers.

The full article is available here: The Wall Street Journal



August sell-off hits big hedge fund names hard

Reuters - Aug 2011

BOSTON/NEW YORK, Aug 9 (Reuters) - August is not even two weeks old and for top hedge fund traders like Steven Cohen, John Paulson and Bill Ackman it could be a month to forget.

Even Cohen, one of the industry's titans, hasn't escaped the global sell-off -- his $14 billion SAC Capital is down 4 percent this month.

Still after SAC's poor start to the year, the fund is still in the black with a roughly 6 percent gain this year.

That's not the case for John Paulson, whose two flagship funds had suffered steep losses even before the month began. The Paulson's Advantage funds lost more than 10 percent in the last week, bringing total losses in the two portfolios, which oversee about $17 billion of investor money, to more than 25 percent.

The brutal global stock sell-off is quickly turning hedge funds that had been up for the year into losers. Meanwhile, funds that entered August already down for the year are piling up even more red ink.

But just as quickly as the Dow Jones industrials plummeted 6.7 percent on Monday, the index climbed back 4 percent on Tuesday, creating ever more uncertain trading conditions for even the savviest stock pickers.

Industry observers say the way things are headed, many funds may post double digit losses for August.

But so far, there appear to be few large hedge fund blowups because many managers were already reducing their stock holdings going into the summer given concerns about Europe's debt crisis, the sluggish U.S. economy and the political impasse over the U.S. debt ceiling.

The carnage, for the moment, appears confined to small and lesser known funds that can't weather a big loss.

"There have been a number of blowups in the past week, particularly small hedge funds in the volatility options arbitrage space," said Evan Rapoport, chief executive of HedgeCo Networks, which helps clients invest with funds and runs a hedge fund.

The full article is available here: Reuters



Report: Paulson's Hedge Funds Lost 10% In Past Week

Barron's - Aug 2011

If you think the past few weeks have been rough on your portfolio, take a look at John Paulson's flagship hedge funds.

His firm's two Advantage Funds have lost more than 10% in the past week, according to Reuters. Those portfolios, which have a combined $17 billion in assets, have lost an estimated 25% so far this year.

"There have been a number of blowups in the past week, particularly small hedge funds in the volatility options arbitrage space," Evan Rapoport, CEO of HedgeCo Networks, said in the report.

Other big hedgies are also believed to be feeling their lumps lately. Bill Ackman's Pershing Square Capital Management, which was down more than 4% at the end of July, has seen some of its biggest bets get hit hard in the downturn. Those include JC Penney (JCP) and Citigroup (C).

The full article is available here: Barron's



Fund Firm Sees Opportunity in Madoff's Wake

Barron's - Jan 2011

EVER SINCE BERNARD MADOFF'S PONZI SCHEME was uncovered in late 2008, funds-of-hedge-funds -- some of which invested with Madoff even though he shared little information with them -- have been getting squeezed. Massive redemptions and gating -- restrictions limiting withdrawals from hedge funds -- left a lot of the funds, and their investors, without an escape hatch as stocks and bonds plummeted during the credit crisis.

Even so, Scott Prince of SkyBridge Capital sees "a secular trend" of individuals and large pension plans, among others, gradually returning to hedge funds. It can't come too quickly for the funds-of-funds, whose assets have fallen from a high of $826 billion in the second quarter of 2008 to $570 billion more recently, according to industry tracker Hedge Fund Research. Total hedge-fund assets, meanwhile, have begun to creep back up to about $1.67 trillion.

"We have seen a number of mergers and acquisitions in the fund-of-fund industry," says Evan Rapoport, managing partner at hedge-fund database HedgeCo.net, in an e-mail. "However, I would say that we have barely scratched the surface and expect to see a large amount of consolidation. Would-be acquirers wanted to wait and see which funds of funds would survive." The number of hedge-fund-of-funds has fallen to 2,117, compared with 2,439 fund of funds at the end of 2008.

The full article is available here: Barron's



Demise of Hedge Funds Has Been Exaggerated

TheStreet - Jun 2010

NEW YORK (TheStreet) -- Investors are returning to hedge funds. During the first four months of the year, hedge funds recorded $24 billion of inflows, according to HedgeFund.net.

The inflows represent a big turnaround from the turmoil of 2008. During the downturn, many funds were forced to liquidate, and some analysts predicted that the hedge fund industry was bound to shrink permanently. Hedge fund assets dropped from a peak of nearly $3 trillion in the second quarter of 2008 to $2.3 trillion this year.

The industry continues to face serious hurdles. With memories of the stock-market meltdown still fresh, many individual investors remain wary of hedge funds. In addition, the new Dodd-Frank financial legislation aims to rein in hedge funds, tightening regulations and restricting investments by banks.

Still, the outlook for the industry remains positive. Many pensions and institutions have been increasing their allocations to hedge funds.

The performance of hedge funds in recent years is helping to attract investors. "Hedge funds have outperformed the S&P 500 and done it with a lot less volatility," says Evan Rapoport, principal of Hedgeco.net, a data provider.

The full article is available here: TheStreet



Opalesque Exclusive: Carbon360 releases Capital Introduction Report

Opalesque Exclusive - Feb 2010

From the Opalesque team:

The general consensus for fundraising is that 2010 holds much in the way of promise for hedge funds. Strong performance in 2009 slowed the enormous tide of redemptions, and net inflows finally took hold at year-end. Seed announcements dot the news headlines and new launches have picked up pace; the growing momentum is palpable.

New York-based research firm Carbon 360° recently sought to determine how those assets would return to hedge funds. The firm surveyed third party marketing firms and capital introduction specialists to gain a clearer picture of investor trends.

According to the survey, institutional investors now dominate the industry's investor base, followed by family offices/pension funds. While these investors are beginning to allocate into hedge funds, there is still a certain amount of apprehension in moving sidelined cash back into the financial markets. "While a large number of institutional and private investors wait on the sidelines, third party marketers focus their efforts on sourcing capital from areas outside of the United States," writes the report's author, Carbon 360 Senior Analyst Daniel Golyanov.

Fund of hedge funds, which once were the gateway to the hedge fund industry for many institutional investors have seen their foothold greatly diminished as many institutions have instead hired in-house hedge fund specialists. This drop off in assets is reflected as surveyed marketers and capital introduction specialists gave them third place in terms of investor size.

The future of fund of hedge funds is still very much in the air. Those that did not gate funds and that performed well over the past two years will likely benefit from much less competition. But the re-growth of the FoHF space will likely only occur if the "liquidity mismatch" problems that are built into the typical FoHF business model and that caused severe distress during the height of the liquidity crisis are addressed.

Considering this shift in the investor landscape, it is no surprise that transparency and risk management are almost equally important as performance for hedge fund investors. Large institutions have spent much of the past year demanding better reporting, and pressuring funds to make use of third party providers such as risk management platforms, valuations specialists and third party administrators. "As capital begins to return to the industry the biggest winners will be managers with proven track records, large assets under management, and an infrastructure that allows for greater transparency," concludes Golyanov.

Third party marketers themselves have also reportedly picked up the pace of the due diligence they do on their own hedge fund partners, mainly in anticipation of the even more stringent due diligence performed by potential institutional investors.

While expectations for the asset-raising climate as a whole are optimistic, with the bulk of allocations expected to come from institutional investors, a large portion of hedge fund managers will not even be able to compete for these funds. New managers and those with performance records of less than 5 years do not stand much of a chance in securing institutional assets, which in addition to performance track records often require the type of infrastructure that only multi-billion dollar funds have in place.

This is likely why the majority of hedge fund clients that third party marketers are in business with are new and young hedge fund firms. The smaller investment base looking at these funds (family offices and high net worth individuals) means competition for assets in this crowd will be fierce. With the majority of third party marketers paid only upon securing allocations (most reported to take fees of 20% on all management and performance fees of incoming allocations), fund managers are more open to outsourcing their marketing and investor relations efforts, and focusing on the performance of their funds.

"2010 should be a prosperous year for alternative investments." Evan Rapoport, CEO of HedgeCo Securities LLC is quoted as saying in the report. "The managers and investors who survived 2008 and 2009 are the cream of the crop, providing third party marketers and capital introduction firms with a vast array of opportunity. As hedge funds go, so goes the capital introduction industry,"

The full article is available here: Opalesque Exclusive



Arthur Nadel Funds Raised Questions in 2005

NewsInferno - Feb 2009

A hedge fund database website raised serious doubts about funds managed by accused Florida Ponzi schemer Arthur Nadel in 2005. According to the Sarasota Herald Tribune, when the founders of the HedgeCo.net database then called Nadel's firm, Scoop Management Inc., to obtain audited financials for the funds, they were rebuffed.

Nadel was president of Scoop Management, which managed six private investment funds. The funds managed by Scoop included Viking IRA, Valhalla Investment Partners LP, Viking, Victory, Victory IRA and Scoop Real Estate. Viking IRA, Valhalla and Viking funds were managed by Nadel under contract with his partners, Neil and Chris Moody.

Nadel disappeared on January 14, a day before he was to deliver a $50 million payout to investors. He left his family a purported suicide note, but it was always suspected that Nadel was alive and on the run.  Nadel turned himself in to the FBI in Tampa late last month. He has been charged with one count each of securities fraud and wire fraud. If convicted, Nadel could face maximum of 20 years in prison on each charge.

According to the Herald Tribune, in 2005 the HedgeCo.net database raised a number of red flags over the Viking and Vahalla funds.

The full article is available here: NewsInferno



Arthur Nadel Funds Raised Questions in 2005

Herald-Tribune - Feb 2009

A hedge fund database website raised serious doubts about funds managed by accused Florida Ponzi schemer Arthur Nadel in 2005. According to the Sarasota Herald Tribune, when the founders of the HedgeCo.net database then called Nadel's firm, Scoop Management Inc., to obtain audited financials for the funds, they were rebuffed.

Nadel was president of Scoop Management, which managed six private investment funds. The funds managed by Scoop included Viking IRA, Valhalla Investment Partners LP, Viking, Victory, Victory IRA and Scoop Real Estate. Viking IRA, Valhalla and Viking funds were managed by Nadel under contract with his partners, Neil and Chris Moody.

Nadel disappeared on January 14, a day before he was to deliver a $50 million payout to investors. He left his family a purported suicide note, but it was always suspected that Nadel was alive and on the run.  Nadel turned himself in to the FBI in Tampa late last month. He has been charged with one count each of securities fraud and wire fraud. If convicted, Nadel could face maximum of 20 years in prison on each charge.

According to the Herald Tribune, in 2005 the HedgeCo.net database raised a number of red flags over the Viking and Vahalla funds.

The full article is available here: Herald-Tribune



Alpha Romeos

Outlook PROFIT - Feb 2009

On the night of December 3, about 650 guests piled on to Nikki Beach on the east side of Manhattan drinking dirty martinis and grooving into the early hours of the morning. Not an unusual sight in New York, except that the party was hosted for the much-battered hedge fund industry. "For months, all you hear about is lagging numbers, layoffs and huge bailouts. Just for a night, I wanted everyone to forget all that. I think everyone was long overdue for a good time," says Evan Rapoport, co-founder of HedgeCo Networks and organiser of the event.

The full article is available here: Alpha Romeos



IPA Spotlights Evan Rapoport

International Press Association - May 2007

We are proud to showcase the talents of IPA member and HedgeCo Networks principle, Evan Rapoport Evan Rapoport is the son of IPA founder Len Rapoport. He is a principal and co-founder of the West Palm Beach based internet and hedge fund consulting company, HedgeCo Networks.

The full article is available here: IPA



Electronic tracking for Cayman domiciled funds

International Press Association - Apr 2007

Palm Beach, Florida: HedgeCo.Net, 4 April, 2007 - As domicile for approximately 80% of the world's hedge funds, the Cayman Islands have now implemented a mechanism for the electronic submission of annual returns for all funds licensed, registered and administered in the Cayman Islands.

The full article is available here: IPA


International Press Asoc

2007

IPA SPOTLIGHTS EVAN RAPOPORT

We are proud to showcase the talents of IPA member and HedgeCo Networks principle, Evan Rapoport
Evan Rapoport is the son of IPA founder Len Rapoport. He is a principal and co-founder of the West Palm Beach based internet and hedge fund consulting company, HedgeCo Networks.

Cayman Net News

April 4, 2007

Electronic tracking for Cayman domiciled funds

Palm Beach, Florida: HedgeCo.Net, 4 April, 2007 - As domicile for approximately 80% of the world's hedge funds, the Cayman Islands have now implemented a mechanism for the electronic submission of annual returns for all funds licensed, registered and administered in the Cayman Islands.

Wealth Manager Mag

September 2006

Mixing it up - Do funds of funds give investors the best of both worlds -- or the worst?

The time is ripe for looking at funds of funds, says Evan Rapoport, a principal with hedge fund research and services firm HedgeCo.Net. "It's important for investment advisors to start lookng at hedge funds or funds of funds as part of their asset allocation because if they don't, an investment manager who does will end up taking business away from them." According to Rapoport, the more than 9,000 hedge funds managing around $1.5 trillion in assets pursue a wide range of investment strategies.

Securities Industry

March 2006

Hedge Funds Grow Up, and So Does the Advice They Get

"There are very low barriers to entry but very high barriers to staying in the business," notes Evan Rapoport, principal of HedgeCo Networks, a hedge fund information and consulting firm in West Palm Beach, Fla. Competition is treacherous and lots of start-up funds don't survive. "While the high-profile start-ups command great attention," he says, "many established managers are busy broadening their product offering and expanding their footprint," in turn "raising the bar on what it takes to be successful as a new manager.".

Variety

Jan 22, 2006

Studios needing money seek outside investors

Hollywood has had outside investors in the past and many of them have been burned. But the new crew have logical motives for getting into business with Hollywood. Consulting firm Hedgeco Networks has had six requests over the past year to start up Hollywood film funds. It had none the previous year, according to principal Evan Rappaport.

Registered REP

Nov 1, 2005

I Want To Be Like Julian

Until this past September, Jeffrey Glusman was a financial advisor at Merrill Lynch, a rising star sharing a book worth more than $250 million with a partner, a book truly to be envied. But after five successful years as an advisor, he's calling it quits - leaving his clients with his partner to start a hedge fund with a longtime friend. Glusman says the biggest surprise in starting up has been how cheap it is. In a package provided by hedgfundtools.com, the consulting arm of HedgeCo Networks, an industry information source, he got everything he needed to start Mogul - including legal and accounting services, auditors, prime broker introductions, Web site construction, database membership with Hedgeco.net and hedge fund software. And all that for $35,000. "If you go a la carte it's very expensive - buffet-style is cheap," he says.

Hedge Fund Alert

September 28, 2005

Consultant Hawks Low-Priced Software

HedgeCo Networks plans to charge customers $995 per year to use its Hedgefundcalculator program, undercutting the $5,000/year charge that the West Palm Beach, Fla., firm maintains is the going rate among its rivals.The program computes quantitative statistics, converts gross returns into net figures and generates monthly data for marketing materials. It also allows fund-of-fund managers to calculate their performance. However, the program isn't as comprehensive as some other products on the market, such as Strategic Financial Solutions' PerTrac software package. But HedgeCo says that small fund operators generally can't afford such extensive programs anyway, creating a niche for Hedgefundcalculator.

Newsweek

June 11, 2005

NewsWeek Web Exclusive: The Ins and Outs of Investing

Investors still dream of striking it rich in risky stocks, but in practice they're on the cusp of turning conservative. Financial reality is slowly sinking in. Next month, the oldest baby boomers reach 59 1/2--the age when they can tap a retirement account without paying a penalty. But after adjusting for inflation, the average retirement plan is only 3 percent higher than it was back in 1993. Younger investors have plenty of time to right themselves, but the boomer bulge will soon be up against the wall. A new little voice, at the back of their minds, whispers, "what do I do for income at 65 if I'm retired with no pension, and chose lousy stocks?"

The program computes quantitative statistics, converts gross returns into net figures and generates monthly data for marketing materials. It also allows fund-of-fund managers to calculate their performance. However, the program isn't as comprehensive as some other products on the market, such as Strategic Financial Solutions' PerTrac software package. But HedgeCo says that small fund operators generally can't afford such extensive programs anyway, creating a niche for Hedgefundcalculator.

Evan Rapoport, president of HedgeCo.Net, a Web-based consulting firm, will host a Live Talk on investing on Thursday, June 16, at noon ET.

Newsweek

June 20, 2005

ASK THE PRO: EVAN RAPOPORT, PRESIDENT OF HEDGECO.NET

Wonder where the money's going? Hedge funds. These privately managed, loosely regulated investment pools pulled in $24 billion last quarter. TIP SHEET's Linda Stern asked Rapoport for some perspective.

Tampa Bay Business Journal

March 18, 2005

Hedging on the Tampa Bay area

After 17 years of quietly establishing an investment empire, D. Scott Luttrell wants to share the wealth with others in the Bay area. Luttrell's LCM Group, an investment firm in New Tampa, founded in 1988, has opened its hedge fund to outside investors for the first time since the fund was established in 1995. The hedge fund industry has grown dramatically since 1990, when there were about 300 funds, to more than 8,000 funds now with an estimated $1 trillion under management, according to HedgeCo.Net, a West Palm Beach-based hedge fund research firm.

South Florida Business Journal

March 11, 2005

New SEC rule could stem hedge fund losses

A rule requiring hedge fund managers to register with the SEC or state regulators is coming too late for investors who lost millions in now-closed West Palm Beach-based KL Group. But the new rule, effective next Feb. 1, will help regulators detect hedge fund problems more quickly, according to officials in the SEC's Miami office. HedgeCo Networks, a West Palm Beach-based research firm, reports that 67 hedge funds with Florida offices have registered for its data base. Palm Beach, North Palm Beach, Boca Raton, Miami Beach and Miami all have at least several hedge funds, said Evan Rapoport, a HedgeCo Networks principal.

South Florida Business Journal

July 23th, 2004

SEC acts on hedge fund popularity

Hedge funds aren't just for the Porsche and Rolls-Royce set anymore, a fact that's catching the eye of regulators. The SEC is concerned about growing risks as some hedge funds allow in investors with income as little as $200,000 - $300,000 for a couple - or net worth as low as $1 million. There are indications that a growing number of Americans in the $200,000 income range are investing in hedge funds. HedgeCo principal Evan Rapoport is concerned that cost of compliance for SEC registration could lead some hedge funds to raise fees for investors and, in a few cases, possibly close U.S. offices.




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